Taking It Back To The Roaring 20’s In the Gotham City

The MTA’s Holiday Season Nostalgia Trains run on the Sixth Avenue line between Queens Plaza and Second Avenue stations on four consecutive Sundays, November 30th-December 28th between 10am and 5pm. (Technically, it’s the M line but since that train doesn’t run in Manhattan on weekends, you’ll actually be catching a special shuttle.) For your regular fare, you can enjoy a classic ride on vintage R1 to R9 subway trains that date from the 1930s through the 1970s. Old-school advertisements, from quaint to downright funny, and overhead displays have all been maintained and refurbished by the New York Transit Museum. Some commuters like to showcase their vintage fashion while dancing to the music of the several swing and jazz ensembles in the train and on the 2nd Avenue F train station. You can also check my video from the train on Juha Photography Youtube channel.

The vintage trains will hit all of the stops along the M line every 90 minutes or so. 34th Street/Herald Square, 42nd Street/Bryant Park and 47-50th Streets/Rockefeller Center are all on the route, so you can take an old-fashioned ride to some old-fashioned seasonal fun, like Macy’s Santaland, ice-skating rink at Bryant Park and all of the department store holiday windows on 5th Avenue.

 

 

 

 

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Pre-manhattanhenge sunset

Today was supposed to be the big Manhattanhenge. Lots of people anticipated the bi-annual phenomenon by hitting the streets of Manhattan with their cameras and phones. However it turned out tonight was big dissapointment, especially for those who missed last night (see my previous post), the reason being that the clouds completely blocked the sun when it was perfectly aligned with the street grid of the city. Only 30 minutes before there was a gorgeous sunset which I was able to capture a little bit at the Meatpacking District were the hight of the buildings is not an obstacle to seeing the sunset. I think they came out alright although they might not officially make it to the Manhattanhenge archives of the world.20140712-232943-84583177.jpg

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Swedish Midsummer Festival in Battery Park, Manhattan

Scandinavians celebrate the summer solstice, the longest day of the year, with a festival of light, flowers, food, and music. The Consulate General of Sweden organizes an annual festival in Battery Park, Manhattan. Thousands of people gather to sing, dance around a massive maypole, eat Scandinavian foods and just have a good time. Many women wear flower wreaths on their heads, and some people dress in traditional folk costume.

The summer solstice celebration has its roots in pre-Christian practices and belief that the spirits of nature join the human community to rejoice in the long days of summer. Midsummer was originally a fertility festival with many customs and rituals associated with nature and with the hope for a good harvest in autumn.

Today in Scandinavia midsummer is a time to escape to the country to spend  relaxing time in nature – a time to connect with friends and family and exuberantly celebrate the joys of life.