Portrait Photo Shoot in Downtown Manhattan

Here are a few shots from a portrait photo shoot I did in downtown Manhattan recently. All photos are taken with Canon 5d Mark iii and 85mm f/1.8 USM lens. Do you need photos for your social media presence, modeling portfolio, business or engagement? You can send me an inquiry or book me for a photo shoot by clicking the “contact” tab under my website menu.

 

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Spring Wedding in Connecticut

I had a great time shooting the wedding of Andrew and Lymarie in Connecticut. The day before the wedding it was pouring rain all day, which made everyone a bit nervous since the reception was outdoors at the beautiful grounds of the Candlewood Inn in Brookfield, CT. But to everyone’s relief the wedding day turned out to be a perfectly beautiful, sunny day. As usual, I used my Canon 5D Mark iii for all of the shots and my assistant had a Canon 6D. Having an assistant is a great asset and allows us to capture the action from two angles simultaneously. This is especially helpful during the reception but also during the portrait session when the second camera man can also help out as a lighting assistant. I find that the Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM lens is wonderfully versatile and covers most of my needs for the fast moving and at times chaotic wedding photography.  Its long range comes especially handy during wedding ceremony when you need to get those intimate close ups without getting in anyone’s way. The other lens that I find irreplaceable for weddings is my Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM. This wide angle is especially helpful for the “getting ready” shoots which often take place in a considerably restricted environment, such as hotel rooms etc. The wide angle is also priceless for the reception where you might want to get more of the action in your pictures.

Prior to the wedding we did a post-wedding portrait shoot with the wedding party in a nearby park. There were some large trees nearby that provided deep shadow for the wedding party which is normally a positive thing as you don’t want your wedding party standing in the hard midday light with a lot of shadows cast on their faces. The challenge we had in this particular scenario was that the beautiful, natural backdrop was completely exposed by the hard midday sun. As a photographer you have to be careful to not to allow your camera to set the exposure for the bright backlight as this would cause the wedding party to be underexposed. On the other hand if you expose for the shadows you risk overexposing and loosing all the detail of the beautiful background. To help compensate for the bright back light I had my assistant use a large, 6′ x 4′ Lastolite reflector to throw in some fill light for the wedding party.  This can be tricky at times partly because of the large size of the reflector and partly because some people’s eyes can be very sensitive to the reflected sunlight. The trick is to do it fast and to break it up every minute or so. Also it can be a challenge to get even light for a group as large as I had here, a total of 16 persons. You can also have the couple look away from the reflector, as I did in this shot.

Often a lot of action takes place during the more relaxed atmosphere at the reception. This is an opportunity for some real fun, memorable, candid moments. At the same time, the reception can be a real challenge as far as good lighting goes. This is were those speedlites come in real handy. In this particular occasion the wedding party loved to rock the dance floor and I had fun capturing all of the fun. As I was shooting with the wide angle lens I needed to mix and mingle with the wedding party in order to really capture the joy and exuberance at this party. I used the second curtain sync option available in Canon’s speedlites to create fun light trails from the colorful lights illuminating the dance floor. I also use Canon’s Speedlite Transmitter ST-E3-RT which allows me to hold the speedlite (with a dome diffuser) off camera in my left hand while holding the camera and shooting with my right hand.

After the ceremony I shot a few quick portraits in the golden light of the setting sun. The narrow time frame between the wedding ceremony and the reception can easily make for one hectic portrait shoot. My recommendation therefore is to take the portraits before the reception if possible, or even day before the wedding. However in this case the ceremony ended just before the “golden hour,” which left us less than 60 minutes to get some fantastic portraits before it was completely dark. With the help of my assistant I used a three Canon 600EX-RT speedlite setup to provide fill light for the couple while retaining the beautiful colors of the sunset in the background.

Want to book me for your wedding or engagement? Contact me directly by submitting the contact form at the bottom of this article or by visiting Juha Photography website and choosing Contact from the menu.