Capturing The Wedding Reception

My favorite part to capture in a wedding is usually the end of a reception party. This is when  most people finally let their guard off and show a side of themselves that only appears only at this moment. I captured these images during the last hour of my first Indian wedding in Pennsylvania.

The reception is usually preceded by several hours of work that requires the most intense focus and concentration from all parties involved. The wedding couple can be nervous as they hope that everything will be just right on their special day.  As a photographer you are fully aware of your responsibility to hopefully capture all of the key moments as history is made for your client and couple. So by the time of the reception I definitely feel a bit drained from hours of intense work. But I always feel a resurge of energy when I see the joy and exuberance on people’s faces  as they celebrate this special and joyful occasion.

From the technical point of view I usually set my camera on full manual mode to capture just enough ambient light without pushing my ISO too hard to avoid too much digital noise in the images. I like to keep my shutter speed fairly low to capture a sense of motion as people dance the night away. Then I use my flash to as a fill in to give the photos a punch. By setting my Canon 600-EX speed lights on a second curtain sync mode, I can add nice light trails to the images. Finding just the right balance requires some experimentation but once I hit the sweet spot, I get onto the dance floor and fire away… while trying to stay out of the way:)

If you are interested in booking me as your wedding photographer, send me an inquiry using the form below or via my website by clicking “contact” in the menu.

 

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Swedish Midsummer Festival in Battery Park, Manhattan

Scandinavians celebrate the summer solstice, the longest day of the year, with a festival of light, flowers, food, and music. The Consulate General of Sweden organizes an annual festival in Battery Park, Manhattan. Thousands of people gather to sing, dance around a massive maypole, eat Scandinavian foods and just have a good time. Many women wear flower wreaths on their heads, and some people dress in traditional folk costume.

The summer solstice celebration has its roots in pre-Christian practices and belief that the spirits of nature join the human community to rejoice in the long days of summer. Midsummer was originally a fertility festival with many customs and rituals associated with nature and with the hope for a good harvest in autumn.

Today in Scandinavia midsummer is a time to escape to the country to spend  relaxing time in nature – a time to connect with friends and family and exuberantly celebrate the joys of life.